Food For Thought: Healthy Tips & Tricks

 

The New Year is just around the corner, has your family made a resolution to get healthy for the New Year?

Keep up the healthy habits by using these tips with your child!

http://kidshealth.org/parent/nutrition_center/healthy_eating/habits.html

Food for Thought- Healthy Holiday Travel Tips

With the smell of firewood drifting through the night air, cooler temperatures, shorter days and daylight savings in full swing—often our thoughts turn toward holiday travels.

The world famous Mayo Clinic provides a multitude of medical services, but they are also well known for their Healthy Tips newsletter.

As a traveler, we may experience one or all of the below symptoms and you may find this information helpful:

Jet lag — Older adults may have more severe jet lag and take longer to recover. Travelers can minimize jet lag by shifting to the local schedule as soon as possible. Travelers may be able to avoid jet lag by adjusting sleep schedules a few days before traveling.  Good news-Children often sleep during long flights and tend to bounce back faster than adults.

Traveler’s diarrhea — Contaminated food or water, or even excitement, anxiety and jet lag can contribute to traveler’s diarrhea. It often strikes abruptly and causes four to five loose or watery bowel movements each day. In most cases, traveler’s diarrhea will go away in a day or two without medical treatment. Most doctors don’t recommend preventive medications such as antibiotics or medicine such as Pepto-Bismol except in special circumstances. The best prevention is good hand hygiene and food and water safety. International travelers should drink only bottled beverages or liquids that have been boiled. For food, the general rule is: “Boil it, peel it, cook it or forget it.”

Motion sickness — Travelers susceptible to motion sickness should consult a physician about over-the-counter or prescription medications. Some natural remedies have been shown to reduce symptoms, too. Options include acupressure wristbands, ginger tea or dietary supplements or aromatherapy.  (One of our Regional Vice Presidents swears that smelling peppermint oil is very helpful.)

Care before travel — Travelers of all ages, leaving the country can benefit from a pre-travel medical appointment, ideally four to six weeks before departure. The doctor will perform a physical exam and assess the health risks associated with travel plans.

In most cases, the patient’s regular doctor can provide this care. Travelers with specific medical conditions who are heading to Asia, Africa or Latin America may benefit from an appointment at a travel medicine clinic. There, care providers often have advanced training or, board certification in travel medicine or tropical medicine. While services at these clinics vary, many providers offer a comprehensive overview of health hazards associated with specific travel plans and detailed advice on how to stay well.

Be safe — Injury is the most common cause of preventable death among travelers. Common-sense safety tips — wearing seat belts, avoiding traveling alone or at night, and moderating alcohol intake — will serve travelers well no matter where they are.

For those of you traveling this holiday season we at Cadence Education wish you safe and healthy travels.

Credits: Mayo Clinic Newsletter

Food For Thought: Healthy Tips & Tricks

10 Healthy Ideas for a Lean Barbecue Season

We strive to provide healthy menus for our children that feed their bodies for growth and performance.

Here are some tips to help you enjoy the BBQ season while keeping your dinners as lean and healthy as can be.

 

Food For Thought: Healthy Tips & Tricks

How do you get your children to eat better?

Children learn their habits, attitudes and beliefs from their parents and other caregivers.  This includes their willingness to try new and healthy foods.

Here are 15 ways to get your children to eat better from parent.com.

Food For Thought: Healthy Tips & Tricks

Children’s nutrition: 10 tips for picky eaters

Children’s nutrition doesn’t have to be frustrating. Consider these strategies to avoid power struggles and help the picky eater in your family eat a balanced diet.

 

Read more from the Mayo Clinic

Food For Thought: Healthy Tips & Tricks

March is National Nutrition Month

Savor the flavor of eating right this month!

National Nutrition Month is a nutrition education and information campaign sponsored annually by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

The campaign is designed to focus attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

Take time this month to discuss the importance of a balanced diet and routine exercise with your children.

Read More on nationalnutritionmonth.org

Food For Thought: Healthy Tips & Tricks

February is Children’s Dental Health Month

The best time to instill good dental health care like prevention, good food choices, and dental hygiene habits is in childhood. Talk to your children about the importance of keeping your teeth healthy!

Check out these fun dental health activities and crafts that will help reinforce the concepts being taught.

Read More On kidssoup.com

Food For Thought: Healthy Habits for the New Year

Has your family made a resolution to get healthy for the New Year?

Keep up the healthy habits by using these tips with your child!

Read More On kidshealth.org

Food For Thought: Healthy Holiday Food

Whether looking for the perfect teachers’ gift or the perfect late-night snack for a persnickety Santa, your kids will enjoy preparing treats for everyone on their list – not to mention themselves.

  1. Ice Browned Butter Sugar Cookies
  2. Gingerbread People
  3. Popcorn Brittle
  4. Chocolate-Hazelnut Meringue Kisses
  5. Oatmeal Toffee Cookies

Read More On cookinglight.com

Food For Thought: Tips for Healthy Travels

With the smell of firewood drifting through the night air, cooler temperatures, shorter days and daylight savings in full swing—often our thoughts turn toward holiday travels.

The world famous Mayo Clinic provides a multitude of medical services, but they are also well known for their Healthy Tips newsletter.

As a traveler, we may experience one or all of the below symptoms and you may find this information helpful:

Jet lag — Older adults may have more severe jet lag and take longer to recover. Travelers can minimize jet lag by shifting to the local schedule as soon as possible. Travelers may be able to avoid jet lag by adjusting sleep schedules a few days before traveling.  Good news-Children often sleep during long flights and tend to bounce back faster than adults.

Traveler’s diarrhea — Contaminated food or water, or even excitement, anxiety and jet lag can contribute to traveler’s diarrhea. It often strikes abruptly and causes four to five loose or watery bowel movements each day. In most cases, traveler’s diarrhea will go away in a day or two without medical treatment. Most doctors don’t recommend preventive medications such as antibiotics or medicine such as Pepto-Bismol except in special circumstances. The best prevention is good hand hygiene and food and water safety. International travelers should drink only bottled beverages or liquids that have been boiled. For food, the general rule is: “Boil it, peel it, cook it or forget it.”

Motion sickness — Travelers susceptible to motion sickness should consult a physician about over-the-counter or prescription medications. Some natural remedies have been shown to reduce symptoms, too. Options include acupressure wristbands, ginger tea or dietary supplements or aromatherapy.  (One of our Regional Vice Presidents swears that smelling peppermint oil is very helpful.)

Care before travel — Travelers of all ages, leaving the country can benefit from a pre-travel medical appointment, ideally four to six weeks before departure. The doctor will perform a physical exam and assess the health risks associated with travel plans.

In most cases, the patient’s regular doctor can provide this care. Travelers with specific medical conditions who are heading to Asia, Africa or Latin America may benefit from an appointment at a travel medicine clinic. There, care providers often have advanced training or, board certification in travel medicine or tropical medicine. While services at these clinics vary, many providers offer a comprehensive overview of health hazards associated with specific travel plans and detailed advice on how to stay well.

Be safe — Injury is the most common cause of preventable death among travelers. Common-sense safety tips — wearing seat belts, avoiding traveling alone or at night, and moderating alcohol intake — will serve travelers well no matter where they are.

For those of you traveling this holiday season we at Cadence Education wish you safe and healthy travels.

Credits: Mayo Clinic Newsletter